DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

 

ASSIGNMENT 5 – PORTRAITS AND LIGHTING DIRECTIONS  IN B&W OR COLOR

 

FEATURED DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTISTS: 

After reading the introduction, pay special attention to the lighting direction and quality in the web sites below. 

Portraits come from a New Brunswick, NJ photog at: http://www.mariamanjelo.com/portraits.html?pages=portrait%2520photos&gclid=CLi1luHHupwCFc5L5Qod0zO2ng

Emphasis on shadow and light are well developed with the images of New Zealander,  Alan Morton at  http://crash.ihug.co.nz/%7Ealanju/index.html    Want to communicate with him?  Give him a shout at: alanmortonnz@yahoo.co.nz

Paul Roark from California has given us a wonderful variety of images showing strong emphasis on natural lighting directions.  Check out his thumbnails and click to enlarge them at http://home1.gte.net/res0a2zt/thumbnails.html

 

 

INTRODUCTION:   

 

PORTRAITS

    1.  CANDID.  This goes to the People in Their Environment type of photo. Candids are informal images and are where the subject knows you are taking the images and poses informally.  The real candid is where the subject has no knowledge of your taking the picture.  Shooting from the hip with the camera not held at your face is often a great way to achieve this portraiture.  The background can or cannot play an important part in the image.

    2.  FORMAL POSES.  Formal poses are posed in that the person or people are aware that you are shooting them.

        2.1.  POSING A SINGLE MODEL.

                2.1.1.  Turn the head of the model in either the same or opposite direction of the body.

                2.1.2.  Turn the light source to different angles or have the model move in relationship to the light      source.

                2.1.3.  The various types of shots are head shots, upper body shots, full quarter shots, full body shots.

                2.1.4.  Let the model fill the frame as much as possible.

                2.1.5.  Try to have the model have an expression or gesture with meaning.

                2.1.6.  Turn the camera vertically or horizontally. 

                    2.1.7.  Make certain the eyes are in the upper third of the frame unless wearing a hat.

        2.2.  POSING TWO PEOPLE OR A GROUP.

                2.2.1.  In traditional portraits, make the man taller than the woman.

                2.2.2.  Heads close or together.  No boring space between them.

                2.2.3.  Fill the vertical or horizontal frame.  No large dead spaces.

                2.2.4.  Take more than you need, select the best expressions.

                2.2.5.  In the Western Tradition of photography, people are more important than the environment.  In the Eastern Tradition, people are reflected more as part of their environment. 

 

 

LIGHTING DIRECTION

The quality and direction of light affects the quantity of contrast between light and dark areas.

SIDE LIGHTING: The main light comes from either the left or right side and gives the strongest 3 dimensional effect to a subject.  It can be used to emphasize the rugged features of one’s face or showing skin or fabric texture.

 

                                         

 

SOURCES: http://www.puhsd.k12.ca.us/maidu/images/Photography/FieldTrips02/IMG_0056SergeRES.jpg http://www.goldfishparadise.com/articles/images/sidelit.jpg.

 

BOTTOM or UNDER LIGHTING: The light is aimed up at the subject.  When shooting people with bottom lighting they often look evil, dark, spooky and mysterious.

 

          

     Using a strong flashlight or 200-300 watt  bulb gives great bottom lighting if your exposure time is long enough.

SOURCES:  http://static.wired.com/movies/96/21/stuff/twister.bug.gif, www.ianrowan.com/photography/ glow/glow4.html,http://hs.riverdale.k12.or.us/~catherinew05/gallery/frontlighting.jpg

 

HIGH SIDE LIGHTING: The light is about 45 degrees from the subject.  It is a classical angle for portrait lighting and models the face into a nice three dimensional form. 

 

                                                                              

 

                         

SOURCES:  http://www.westenholz.co.uk/reprod5.jpg http://www.classicmoviekids.com/images/m/marshall/marshallconnie309.jpg.

 

TOP LIGHTING: The overhead light source creates deep shadows under overhanging parts of an object.  In a portrait, deep shadows are found in the eyes, under the nose and under the chin.  It occurs at noon when the sun is straight up in the heavens.  In the product shot, top lighting is slightly to the read creating a shadow in front of the objects.

 

                                               

 

SOURCES:  http://www.pixiport.com/Gallery-I/GI5-04-s.jpg, http://www.copal.co.jp/images/p13_04.gif, http://web.telecom.cz/photography.iol.cz/images/cameron.jpg. http://www.wpi.edu/Academics/Depts/HUA/TT/TTHandbook/lighting/images/frontlight.jpg,

 

 

BACK LIGHTING occurs when the light source is behind the subject.  This creates high contrast, greatly reduces subject detail and simplifies form.  The subject is silhouetted against a light background.

 

                                                                           

 

SOURCES:  http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=members.tripod.com/~bb822/p3-b.jpg&imgrefurl=http://bb822.tripod.com/&h=919&w=709&sz=124&tbnid=CB-B2gdpv-UJ:&tbnh=145&tbnw=112&prev=/images%3Fq%3DFAMOUS%2BPHOTOGRAPHERS%26start%3D40%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8%26oe%3DUTF-8%26sa%3DN, http://digilander.libero.it/fotogian/controluce.fotogian.jpg.

 

FRONT LIGHTING:  Front lighting is where the light source comes from behind the photographer and hits the subject head on at the front.  It can be soft or harsh light. 

 

       computer model of a full frontal lighting  computer model of beam from front

 

flatfro2.jpg (39965 bytes) hifro4.jpg (35266 bytes)   

 

SOURCES:  http://www.kokopelliflutes.com/maryyoungbloodflute-front-lg.jpg,http://www.compulink.co.uk/~davedorn/reviews/hard/digital/digiro9.jpg, 2 Xhttp://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.shef.ac.uk/english/literature/lighting/flat1.jpg&imgrefurl=http:

//www.shef.ac.uk/english/literature/lighting/frontlighting.htm&h=375&w=500&sz=15&tbnid=4_GEF2kdUscJ:&tbnh=95&

tbnw=126&start=3&prev=/images%3Fq%3DfrontAL%2Blighting%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D, 2X http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.albertson.edu/art/photoaci/lighting/hifro4.jpg&imgrefurl=

http://www.albertson.edu/art/photoaci/lighting/highfro4.htm&h=408&w=500&sz=35&tbnid=RTN8ZeXUDN4J:&tbnh

=103&tbnw=126&start=12&prev=/images%3Fq%3DfrontAL%2Blighting%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D, http://centralwestchesteraudubon.org/Graphics/04bluebird_dickbudnik.gif. http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://centralwestchesteraudubon.org/Graphics/04bluebird_dickbudnik.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.centralwestchesteraudubon.org/PhotographingBirdsLocally4.htm&h=355&w=182&sz=32&tbnid=9-6VSa6PG8IJ:&tbnh=115&tbnw=58&start=14&prev=/images%3Fq%3DfrontAL%2Blighting%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D,

 

HOMEWORK SHOOTING GOALS:

1.  Let your main subject FILL THE FRAME.  Get close up or use a zoom if you have appropriate lenses.   

2.  Use interesting composition.  Keep the center of interest away from the center of the picture.  Use the Rule of Thirds. 

NO FLASH!  ALL SHOTS MUST BE IN FOCUS.

3.    “What is my intent?  Why am I shooting this image?  What do I want to convey to people who see the printed image?

4.   Shoot outdoors and indoors and work only in color.

 

 HOMEWORK SHOOTING  ASSIGNMENT:

Take at least three shots in each of  top lighting, back lighting, side lighting, front lighting, bottom lighting.

Using the subject matter of your choice. (adults/children - get permission to shoot people you do not know).

Print 3 shots from the assignment. 

 

HOMEWORK SHOT LIST:

  All shots must be in focus to submit.

 

 

_____   _____ ______ TOP LIGHTING

_____   _____ ______ BACK LIGHTING OR SILHOUETTE

_____   _____ ______ SIDE LIGHTING

_____   _____ ______ FRONT LIGHTING

_____   _____ ______ BOTTOM LIGHTING

 

Submit only your best shots.  Submit shots in color.Take more than 15 so you have some to choose from.

 

 

PREPARATORY PROCEDURE BEFORE STARTING TO WORK ON AN IMAGE:

1.  Size your image.  In the top Photoshop menu go to IMAGE/IMAGE SIZE.  Under Width and Height make certain that

the image is 7" x 10" in any direction.  ALL MOUNTED COURSE PHOTOS WILL BE 7" X 10".

2.  EVERY PHOTO PRINTED FOR EACH ASSIGNMENT MUST BE RESIZED TO 2" X 3" (vertical) OR 3" X 2" (horizontal) AND SAVED IN A SEPARATE FOLDER for your web gallery final exam.

3.  YOU ALSO NEED TO SAVE ALL WRITTEN INVENTORIES to a file of your choice FOR YOUR WEB GALLERY FINAL .

 

CLASS WORK:

1. JOURNAL:

    1.1.  In your journal start a new page entitled “DP 5 – Portraits - Lighting Direction”.

Locate one image of each of the following examples of lighting qualities and directions, glue them into your journal and assign them a label.

 

LIGHTING DIRECTION:

 

2.  PHOTOGRAPHY & PRESENTATION:

 

    2.1.  Copy Photos into Mrs. Proscia teach folder under Digi Photo Pink/Portraits Lighting Direction.

    2.2.  Print your 3 best FULL FRAME shots in terms of composition in Color from this assignment.  All three photos should show the best use of lighting direction as well as portrait composition.

    2.3 Cut or buy 3 11” x 14” mats.

    2.4 Dry mount the 3 prints on 11" x 14" mat board.  Sign the work in white pencil or fine point sharpie on the bottom right hand corner of the mat, just under the photo.

    2.5 Write 3 inventories for the assignment and affix them to the backs of each mounted photograph. You can link onto the WRITTEN INVENTORY preparation page here.

 

PHOTOSHOP:

 

PHOTO PARTS:  Seamlessly combine PARTS of two photographs.   Copy and paste parts of any one image on top

 of a second photograph from this assignment.  Make the imagery fit together by color, shape, texture, line, etc. 

 Strive for something imaginative, exciting, crazy and fun!  Play with the lasso, rectangular and oval marquis tools

 which are located in the two top left tools in the tool box.  

 

PHOTOSHOP IDEAS ~

Check into cool websites that will help you with ideas for Photoshop filters at:  http://www.eyewire.com/tips/photoshop/ http://www.arraich.com/filters/aaintro.htm http://www.graphic-design.com/Photoshop/, or type in the key words "PHOTOSHOP TRICKS" OR PHOTOSHOP FILTER TRICKS" for more.

 

In the top menu under IMAGE/ADJUSTMENTS check into such manipulations as COLOR BALANCE, CURVES, INVERT, EQUALIZE, POSTERIZE.

 

Keep track of what you do with filters by writing down as you go along.